Dr Amedeo Chiribiri

Dr Chiribiri is the clinical lead for the Atherosclerosis theme, Reader in Cardiovascular Imaging at King’s College London and Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust. Dr Chiribiri is the clinical lead for the non-congenital cardiac magnetic resonance service at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Trust Foundation. The major aim of his current research is the investigation of novel cardiac MR techniques for the non-invasive assessment of cardiac structure and function. In particular, Dr Chiribiri’s research focuses on quantification of myocardial blood flow (perfusion) and on the development of novel methods for ischaemia detection and differential diagnosis based on advanced coronary physiology modelling, with a strong emphasis on rapid translation of new methodology into the clinic practice to evaluate benefit for the patient.

Moreover, Dr Chiribiri is actively involved in the development and validation of novel experimental models to simulate physiological and pathophysiological processes. Other research interests include: physiology and pathophysiology of coronary circulation, pathophysiology of myocardial ischaemia and myocardial protection, non-invasive visualization of physiological and pathophysiological processes using advanced cardiovascular imaging.


Professor René Botnar

Professor Botnar is the technical lead for the Atherosclerosis theme, Professor and Chair of Cardiovascular Imaging and Head of the Biomedical Engineering Department at King’s College London. Professor Botnar’s expertise is in the development of novel MRI techniques for cardiovascular and molecular imaging. Professor Botnar and his research group are working on the development of novel MR pulse sequences for free-breathing motion corrected 3D whole heart MRI of the coronary arteries and the myocardium with a major focus on the development of advanced motion correction techniques, novel contrast mechanisms and quantitative tissue characterization. The group is also very active in molecular MRI of atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction using novel target-specific contrast agents (elastin, collagen, albumin, fibrin, macrophages, oxLDL) and recently started with the development and validation of preclinical PET/MR and multimodal PET/MR contrast agents. Current work involves investigating the merits of target-specific MR and PET contrast agents for non-invasive imaging of endothelial integrity, dysfunctional vascular and myocardial remodeling and inflammation in models of atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysm and myocardial infarction. Finally, the group also apply molecular imaging for the better understanding of deep venous thrombus (DVT) resolution and the better guidance of thrombolysis.


Professor Mark O’Neill

Professor O’Neill is clinical lead for the Cardiac Arrhythmia theme, Consultant Cardiologist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (GSTFT) and Honorary Professor in Cardiac Electrophysiology at King’s College London (KCL). He leads the clinical research group in cardiac electrophysiology at GSTFT and is Clinical Lead for the Cardiovascular Clinical Academic Group at KCL Professor O’Neill seeks to better understand the mechanisms which cause cardiac arrhythmias in humans, in particular atrial fibrillation and tachycardia. In-particulars: comparison of fibrosis determined by MRI and electrical conduction properties, evaluation and study of ablation lesions using MRI, and use of new catheter technologies for ablation.


Professor Kawal Rhode

Professor Rhode is the technical lead for the Cardiac Arrhythmia theme, Professor in Biomedical Engineering at KCL with expertise in imaging robotics and multi-modal image processing. Professor Rhode’s Kawal’s team has worked on the development of a robotic catheter for image-guided interventions that is currently being commercialised.

Professor Rhode’s research is highly translational including several commercial products that has the potential to reduce intervention time and radiation exposure. His work is strongly supported by Industry. His current research interests include image-guided interventions, intelligent mechatronics systems for interventions and ultrasound imaging, 3D printing in healthcare and pedagogy for biomedical engineering


Dr Gerry Carr-White

Dr Carr-White is the clinical lead for the Structural Heart Disease theme, a Consultant Cardiologist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (GSTFT) and the Clinical Lead for Cardiology, Heart Failure services and Inherited Cardiac Diseases at the Trust. Dr Carr-White is Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer at KCL and is actively involved in cardiac imaging (echo, MRI and CT) and is the principle investigator in a number of multi-centre clinical studies.

Dr Carr-White’s research interests include echo and MRI assessment of cardiomyopathies and heart failure and assessment and optimisation of cardiac resynchronisation therapy.


Dr Jordi Alastruey-Arimon

Dr Alastruey is the technical lead for the Structural Heart Disease theme. Dr Alastruey is a computer scientist and Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering at King’s College London (KCL). His research interests are focused on computational models of pulse wave propagation in the arterial vasculature and the interaction with the heart, and the assessment by pulse wave analysis of cardiovascular structure and function, vascular morphology and hypertension. He leads the ‘haemod.uk’ academic group at KCL, which specialises in cardiovascular haemodynamics. His group studies blood flow in the cardiovascular system using clinical data and modelling (computational and experimental). They study methods for cardiovascular function assessment based on the analysis of pulse wave signals, such as blood pressure, blood flow and photoplethysmography (PPG) waves. These signals can be measured in vivo using a variety of devices and are influenced by the heart and the vasculature, making them a rich source of information on cardiovascular health.


Professor Aldo Rinaldi

Professor Rinaldi is the clinical lead for the Heart Failure theme, a Consultant Cardiologist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (GSTFT) specialising in the treatment of arrhythmias, heart failure and coronary artery disease, and is a Honorary Professor in Cardiac Electrophysiology at King’s College London. His primary research is on cardiac pacing, in particular cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT-a type of electrical stimulation to treat heart failure) and to reduce non-response to this treatment but has further research interests in electroanatomical mapping and ablation of atrial arrhythmias. Professor Rinaldi has longstanding and strong relationships with medical device industry partners.


Dr David Nordsletten

Dr Nordsletten is the technical theme lead for the Heart Failure theme and a Reader in Cardiovascular Biomechanics at King’s College London (KCL). His research interests are the clinical translation of numerical methods/analysis, computing and mathematical modelling of cardiac mechanics and he has a strong public engagement profile. A particular highlight of Dr Nordsletten’s work is the development of ‘CHeart.co.uk’ at KCL, which is a coding infrastructure project to support worldwide translation of cardiac modelling projects.


Dr Marietta Charakida

Dr Charakida is the clinical lead for the Paediatric Technologies theme, a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Cardiovascular Imaging at KCL and Honorary Consultant in Paediatric Cardiology and Fetal Medicine at Evelina Children’s hospital.

Dr Charakida’s research focuses on vascular imaging, preclinical atherosclerosis and on cardiovascular prevention. She has been involved in cohort studies and life course research.

Dr Marietta is currently developing novel methods for assessment of arterial physiology starting from fetal life. Translation in clinical practice is one of her primary aims.


Dr Pablo Lamata de la Orden

Dr Lamata is the technical lead for the Paediatric Technologies theme, Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering at King’s College London, and the Head of the Cardiac Modelling and Imaging Biomarkers (CMIB) academic group. Dr Lamata focuses on the synergies between computational cardiac models and medical image analysis. His main driver is to reach the clinical translation, proposing novel diagnostic biomarkers to better stratify patients. His main interests are the analysis of cardiac shape through computational meshes, non-invasive methods to estimate central blood pressure and its components, and the robust estimation of metrics of diastolic performance (myocardial stiffness and decaying active tension).